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Feltham Piscatorials.

The Society has a water sharing agreement with the Feltham Piscatorials which enables Society members to fish the Feltham Piscatorials waters. The basis of of the agreement is the exchange of 5 permits.

The waters are listed below.

Sivyers Lake

Sivyers is Feltham Pictorials Premier water located in Sunbury-on-Thames in Middx. The water is open daily from 7.00 a.m. from 1st May - 31st March. It offers all year round fishing with its busy period between June and September. On-site facilities include ladies and gents toilets and a secure all-weather car park. The site has two lakes, the smaller of which will be re-developed in late 2006 to provide a mixed fishery of 20+ pegs specifically designed for pole and light waggler fishing.

Angling is from purpose built swims that provide safe access to the lake. The  main lake has around 40 pegs able to provide first class fishing in a peaceful environment. Sivyers is a mixed coarse fishery but predominately contains Carp to over 20 lb, Bream to over 6lb and Tench to over 5lb along with lots of silver fish such as Roach to over 2lbs, Rudd and Skimmer Bream. The lake also holds some specimen Perch to over 4lbs.

Whilst pellets, sweetcorn and meat are good baits during the summer months, in the colder weather it pays to turn to smaller hook baits such as casters, maggots and worms.

SheepWalk Lake Complex

Sheepwalk complex is situated in Shepperton in Middx. There are two lakes on the complex which mainly contain Carp, Tench and Bream. The smaller lake of the two is popular with pleasure and carp anglers alike while the large lake which runs alongside the M3 motorway is mainly fished by carp anglers.

The large lake on the Sheepwalk complex is said to hold the record tench caught in 2001. Boiles are the main bait used on the complex and carp to over 40lb have been banked this season. In the summer large tench and bream can be caught close to the bank on a variety of baits. Although the pike can be difficult to catch those which are caught are usually well into double figures. Most popular techniques are traditional live and dead baiting but few anglers bother with the spinner. In summer the water is weedy which leads to an abundance of natural food and high growth rates. When fishing, it is vital to find clearings in the weed, where the bottom is usually gravel, and to fish these spots. Trying elsewhere is usually a waste of time. Anglers should also be aware of two gravel bars which arc across the centre of the lake.

Kennet

The society owns the fishing rights on an 800 yard section of the Kennet in Aldermaston noted for good quality chub and barbel with occasional catches of quality roach. The stretch has a variety of swims, the most popular being on the down stream end of the stretch.

  Cranford

This is a worked out gravel pit in Cranford village close to Heathrow airport. The water was once a prolific carp water but now suffers from low water levels. It still holds a head of good sized carp and each year there is an explosion of small carp as the water seems ideal for spawning.

Anglers are advised to be particularly careful when approaching the water as the banks are very steep in some places.

The Creek

There is an official car park for members at the top of the fishery, which then allows anglers access to the river through two fields.

A well-known chub and barbel fishery, the Creek is a private fishery only accessible to members. The river is also well-known locally for barbel which run up to 10lbs, particularly where the water starts to loose its pace.The remainder of the length is good for all silver fish including chub.Favoured baits tend to be bronze maggot and caster, although for the barbel meat baits are an obvious and popular choice, as are specialised commercial barbel baits.Naturally, depths vary from four to six feet along the one mile stretch. The section of river with the woods on the far bank are good for chub and roach. The large bend at the top of the fishery, known as barbel bend, is where the water slows and is generally deeper. Throughout most of the river's length the majority of anglers fish a stick float with ledgering only used when targeting the barbel and chub. When fishing the stick, it is usual to follow the 'inside line' where the river has a bit of pace. Alternatively, another popular method is the pole along the far bank for roach and dace.